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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed
, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet.
and get to places like new york city or cities in our state, and i have always said and will continue to say that those exceptions and the absence of a tougher federal legislation is not good for connecticut, not good for our cities, and, again, i also have firmly believed that these high capacity magazines are extremely dangerous. having said that, being in the top five, i think there have been people -- people have previously thought they have done enough in connecticut. i'm not saying i was one of those. i doubt that there's any one of those left. [ inaudible question ] now that it's been pointed out and i have taken the time to -- we could be compliant with the previous assault weapons ban limitation by going from a -- there's a common sense piece of legislation that could be taken up in the next session. >> we've been listening to a press conference by connecticut governor dannel malloy who noted there were many heroes in connecticut today, but there's also a great deal of pain, many unanswered questions, and grief beyond imagination. on this monday, december the 17th. >> all acr
city, michael bloomberg. mr. mayor, thank you for being here. i wish it weren't under these circumstances. >> just tragedy. terrible. >> you have been an unspoken gun control advocate for many years. never more so than this morning. and we'll talk about that. first, "the new york post," the morning after the slaughter of innocents. describe your reaction when you saw this unfold. >> it's so unbelievable. and it only happens in america. and it happens again and again. there was another shooting yesterday. three people killed in a hospital. we kill people in schools. we kill them in hospitals. we kill them in religious organizations. we kill them when they're young. we kill them when they're old. and we've just got to stop this. >> there is in this country incredible sadness, empathy, anger, and a sense of resolve. and the president speaking after this horrible tragedy really gave voice to that friday afternoon. listen. >> we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. >> a significant stat
deer hunting country, not from the big cities. will they be there? will politicians who fear the gun lobby bear up under the strain of attack against any measure no matter how small to curb the power of the gun owners? the question tonight, what should and most importantly can be done to stop this kind of gun violence? and if nothing will work, say it. go ahead, say nothing can be done. i want to hear an american elected official tonight or any night say what happened on friday in newtown, connecticut, is just part of living in the free society of america. chuck todd is nbc's chief white house correspondent and political director and chris cillizza is managing editor of post politics.com. gentlemen, i know we all saw this. this is what we used to call the topic sentence. i think this was the most telling action oriented piece of what the president said last night up in connecticut. let's listen to it now. >> in the coming weeks i will use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an ef
gun. let's be honest, they are there, they live in big cities, in apartments, they think the police will be there to protect them. then you live out in kansas, out some place out in the country, and you know the police won't be there for a half hour no matter how hard you yell, how many 911s you call. you do have to defend yourself, right? >> absolutely. >> they have attitudes. it is country mouse versus city mouse. bloomberg, who i really respect, the mayor of new york, says something, i'm sure the guy in reading, pennsylvania, says okay, big east coaster tell me how to live. >> he is the wrong person, the absolutely wrong person tosh to be the face of the gun control movement, it really is because of just what you're pointing out. what does that guy in new york city -- and this is where if you have this conversation -- if you lived in new york city, you understand his mindset of not wanting 9 million people armed. >> yeah. >> on new york city. but if what you just pointed out about living in rural america, whether it's kansas, arkansas, you name it, it's different. you're right. y
places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the s
it is december now. 20 over in minneapolis 21 rapid city. on the eastern coast we are seeing temperatures in the 50s. high temperatures won't be warming up a whole lot across carolinas into georgia. temperatures in the low 60s. 46 will be the high temperature in new york city and out west. we have temperatures in the 30s and 40s across parts of oregon and the rockies. they will be producing he shall -- irresponsibilissues across y will be warming up we will see some of the storms will produce severe weather. very unusual to be seeing this activity during the month of december. we have had snow coming down across portions of new hampshire and vermont and the state of maine. you could see accumulations over 8 inches of snow over higher elevations of new england achlt cross the south showers and storms already fired up. we are talking about blizzard conditions possible. we have a number of winter advisories high winds watches and warnings in effect. rain coming down on the coast and please be safe everyone. >> maria molina. it is 10 after the hour. lawmakers don't have a deal on the ifs he c
. the president then spoke. >> there have been almost daily reports of victims, in small towns and big cities across america. vick chims whose much of time, their only fault was being in the wrong place at the wrong time. we can't tolerate this anymore. >> as the president read the first name of each young vick testimony out loud, there were audible sobs and cries. >>> a first grader from sandy hook is the sole survivor from her class. >> she had to play dead before she could get away. >> lara spencer spoke with the pastor counseling the girl's family. >> you have a parishoner who was there. >> she ran out of the billing covered in blood from head to toe, and the first words to her mom were, mommy, i'm okay, but all of my friends are dead. >> was she the only clild in that class who survived? >> yes. of those left in the classroom, she was the lone survivor. >> what did she tell her mom? what did she see in there? >> she saw someone she felt was angry and somebody she felt was very mad. >> how, at 6 1/2 years old, can you be that smart, that brave? >> think it's impossible outside of divine i
this weekend. >> the new york city's children's chorus opened the show singing "silent night." ♪ silent night holy night ♪ ♪ all is calm all is bright ♪ ♪ round yon virgin mother and child ♪ >>> and coming up, a cnn exclusive. we're going to hear from the family of the sandy hook elementary principal who lost her life trying to confront a killer. [ female announcer ] born from the naturally sweet monk fruit, something this delicious could only come from nature. now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. >>> welcome back to this special edition of "early start" this morning from newtown, connecticut. she was
the young people's chorus of new york city lifting their voices to honor those who lost their lives in the sandy hook elementary school shootings. josh and george? >> what a remarkable moment it was, elizabeth. >>> we begin with president obama ps emotional visit here last night. the president meeting with the families devastated by the tragedy and delivering a powerful speech as he paid tribute to the victims. the president was greeted with a standing ovation as he entered the high school auditorium, filled with grieving community members. many of them surviving sandy hook school children, clutching their stuffed animals. >> all across this land of ours, we have wept with you. newtown, you are not alone. >> reporter: the service got under way nearly an hour late as the president first met privately with family members of those killed, including the infant granddaughter of dawn hochsprung. >> we say we're truly doing enough to give all the children of the country the chance they deserve to live out their lives in happiness and with purpose. we're not doing enough. and we will have t
of new york city when he was teaching he would identify kids who were at risk and bring them into his classroom and ask his class to support them and work with them. it seemed like a kind of common sense but a brilliant approach to make everybody part of the solution. >> guest: absolutely. one of the things we see often with kids who have special needs or have a learning disability or autism so often the philosophy is to help give them tools to not be targeted or to make them less likely to be targeted. >> host: like avoiding a different situations? >> guest: different areas of school but we know kids are vulnerable and and there is little supervision but i think that is only one piece of the puzzle. >> host: it's a little bit of a cop-out, right? >> guest: if the had the disabilities that made them more likely to be bullied is the social disability, so i think that one of the things we have to do a better job of, and i think that the essay speaks to this is how do you educate the entire community about disability like autism or learning disabilities so that it's not up to the person
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it is estimated that one in five american veterans in these wars suffer from severe depression or post traumatic stress disorder. retired lieutenant colonel john o blin is one of them. he served four tours in iraq and surrounding persian gulf as well as three tours on the-- tours on the border of israel and egypt, awarded the bronze star, purple heart and kbrat action badge among other commendationses. he joins me tonight to talk about his life, also joining me an extraordinary group of scien titss, mary stein from california san diego, lisa shin from tufts university, kerry russler from emory university, joann difede from cornell and my cohost is dr. eric kandel. a noubl lawyer yet, professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. i am pleased to have all of them here this evening at this table. which begin as we always do talking to eric kandel. what are we doing this evening. >> post traumatic stress disorder. this is a fascinating disorder. and it is unique in psychiatry. it is perhaps the only p
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
pennsylvania governor ed rendell, deputy new york city mayor howard wolfson and editor of the "new york times" magazine edward lindgren. jansing and company's chris jansing joins us now. you have been on the road a lot this year to some very terrible places in the wake of some very serious american tragedies, but this one, if i dare say it, seems a little bit different. give us your sense of your take on the move -- as far as the mood on the ground and how the community is reacting m days since the tragedy. >> alex, it would be difficult to even begin to try to express the depth and the breadth of the pain that this community is feeling and will feel all weeklong. the first of a series of funerals is getting underway right now. i'll show you a page from the local paper, and there are two pages of obituaries of children. we've just learned that governor dan malloy has shown up at the funeral of little noah, 6 years old, noah posner, who has a twin and an 8-year-old sister, and there was a heartbreaking question asked in his obituary. how do you capture the essence of a 6-year-old in just a few
janiero. cuzco. mexico city. >> safer: galileo turned his eyes and his telescope on the heavens. here, from 1612, are his drawings of sunspots. for his insistence that the sun is the center of the universe and the earth moves around it, the church branded him a heretic. >> collins: the pope at that time, pope urban viii, was a very good friend of galileo. said to him, "look, you know, i agree with you. you're right. but i can't approve of this because i'm the pope. and if i go against this, it looks as if i'm going against the bible. and i'm going to shake to the foundation the belief of the world, and the world's christians, not just catholics." >> safer: just 380 years later, in 1992, pope john paul ii apologized for the galileo affair. his successor, benedict xvi, has sought middle ground in the centuries-old skirmishes between the church and science. in a recent sermon, he said even the big bang theory of the creation of the universe is not in conflict with faith because god's mind was behind it. >> this is the tricky, the tricky part... >> safer: and backstage at the pope's libra
share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>> also, the national association for business economics growth in 2013 to come in at 2.1% after growing by 2.2% in 2012. that would continue the same tepid growth that the country has seen since the recession ended back in mid 2009. >>> and the nation is mourning the horrific event of friday in newtown, connecticut. president obama spoke last night about change. >> we can't kol rate this any more. these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex, and that is true. no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil from the world or event every senseless act of violence in our society. >>> and earlier in the day, new york city mayor michael bloomberg called on the president to lead the nation on the issue of gun control. >> it's time for the president, i think, to stand up and lead and tell this country what we should do. not go to congress and say, what you guys w
to be confident and hopeful, and i was impressed by the story in the book about the president in new york city of a school who identify kids who were at risk and he brought them into his classroom and he asked his class to support them. to work with them. it seemed like a commonsense but brilliant approach to making everybody part of the solution. >> guest: absolutely. one of the things we see with kids that have special needs or learning disabilities or autism, so often we need to help give those kits tools to not be targeted or to make them less likely to be targeted. i think avoiding certain situations can help. >> host: we know that kids are vulnerable. >> guest: these kids have the social skills, so many individuals, it is social disability to be in that situation. to be a bully. i think that it comes down to how you educate the entire community about disabilities like autism so that it's not up to the person who is struggling to keep up or who is struggling in this social the social hierarchy, to make sure that everyone else knows that this is what autism looks like. this is why autism -
the 4505 civil affairs battalion coming thome salt lake city, utah -- home to salt lake city. >> they're the ones that have to deal with some really hard times. >> he's over and back. everything is good. no matter what happened, everything is good. >> gretchen: the soldiers had been in afghanistan for nearly a year helping with reconstruction of the country and communication with the civilians there. those are your headlines. >> steve: nice story. straight ahead, he knows the pain in newtown all too well. the principal who led students and staff through the columbine tragedy joins us live next from denver. >> gretchen: remember when the government put aside billions of dollars to help victims of hurricane sandy? wait until you hear where some of that money is really going now ♪ the weather outside is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delightful ♪ nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny me
female members and friends, and all who surround us in our daily tasks. this is no lasting city, we know. may we pass through it with a little more gratitude and with a firmer determination to live the kind of lives we've been called to live. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order, the senate will be in a period of morning business until 3:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. mcconnell: i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new jersey. mr. menendez: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. menendez: mr. president, i rise with a heavy heart at the senseless tragedy in newtown, connecticut, that took place this friday. we're all shaken up from that day, and we ask ourselves why. how could this happen in america? we grope for answers, and i hope we'll
. >> yeah. people from new york city move there because it's safe, because it's removed from all the dangers of urban america. joe, i know you were there. i got there friday. you pull in, and it's been said many times over the last few days, but it's hard to overstate how quintessentially new england this place is. >> it's perfect. >> it's perfect. it's perfect. little shops. a brook that goes through the town. but then when you go over a hill just on the other side, a quarter mile away from the little village of sandy hook, the worst thing imaginable happened. i got there on friday evening. you go up to where the live television locations are, and you come upon first a firehouse which has become very familiar here. a firehouse where kids were rushed a few hundred feet away from the school. and where parent s went to see whether or not their kids were there, whether or not they were alive. there was some incredible reunions there where people were relieved to find their children. and then as we herd slard slowl by one, there was a group of 20 parents standing there who were told their kids w
." the show began with a moving performance by the new york city children's chorus and we've asked them to join us this morning. ♪ silent night holy night all is calm all is bright ♪ ♪ round yon virgin mother and child holy infant so tender and mild ♪ ♪ sleep in heavenly peace sleep in heavenly peace ♪ ♪ silent night holy night shepherds quake at the sight glory streams from heaven afar heavenly hosts sing alleluia ♪ ♪ christ the savior is born christ the savior is born ♪ [ female announcer ] curls are long lasting when they're nourished. ♪ that's why new dove style + care whipped cream mousse nourishes and conditions to help keep curls well defined and touchably soft. new dove style + care whipped cream mousse. better style through better care. new dove style + care whipped cream mousse. nayou just mix together a few. simple ingredients, add a bit of heat, and "voila." so to make truvia baking blend, we shared one of nature's most surprising secrets: sweetness from the stevia leaf. for a blend of truvia natural sweetener and sugar that bakes and browns like sugar,
with mutual friend of ours who is a retired new york city police officer. so, you know, he taught her how to shoot, she was very responsible with the gun. she was very responsible person in general. especially in terms of safety. >> and she took the boys to the shooting range. that's been talked about. she did take them to the shooting range. >> from what i understand, yes. >> and what did you want to say about that? >> again, i guess i want to just mimic russ as far as her safety. nancy wouldn't even answer a phone or a text or even look at her text in the car. if i got in her car, it was oops, seat belt, at the first ding. or before the ding happened. so she was just very careful and cautious and responsible. and in regard to, you know, leaving anything out, as far as a gun, just -- i can't believe that she would do that. >> sebastian, what do you think? tell us about your memory. >> my memories of her, she was a very dignified woman. she had a lot of class. very proper. had a great moral compass. we just saw her, what, three weeks ago, my place, and i left and didn't say bye and she se
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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